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Join Meridith Elliott Powell and Mark Hunter as they share the strategies you need to sell effectively, successfully and logically! 9 a.m. Saturday morning.

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Meridith Elliott Powell
Hey, this is Meredith Elliott Powell, and welcome to another Saturday edition of Sales Logic. I mean, what's better to do on a Saturday morning than talk how to build your sales pipeline and close more deals? This is a show where we talk about it all, everything that you need to know to be more effective, more efficient, more successful and, well, more logical when it comes to sales. And I'm here with my co-host, Mark Hunter.

Meridith Elliott Powell
Good morning, Mark.

Mark Hunter
Good morning. And hey, we've been drinking coffee already this morning. I've been working. I know you've been working what we've been doing. We've been making sales happen. And that's what sales logic is all about. So I think we've got a good show planned.

Meridith Elliott Powell
I think we've got a really great show. We'll give you an update really quick. For those of you who have not been with us before we come to you pretty much every Saturday morning at nine o'clock. And our format is we're going to have an unbelievable topic, something you really need to know to really sell more efficiently and effectively. But my favorite part of the show is when we take a question from you, the audience.

Meridith Elliott Powell
So if you're listening this morning and you've got a question, something you want us to cover, go ahead and visit our website sales logic podcast, dot com, that sales logic podcast, dot com. You can enter the questionnaire or just throw it out on social media and hash tag sales logic. We are going to talk about a book that you should be reading and covering. And last but not least, will leave you with a lightning round with lightning round, because we want you to get return on investment.

Meridith Elliott Powell
These are strategies you can put into place immediately. So, Mark, what do we have on board today?

Mark Hunter
Well, hey, the topic we got today, I think it fits because a lot of people are dealing with it, handling objections and the best strategies for getting past. No, OK, that's the topic.

Mark Hunter
But before we do the topic, we always get into a question. Longtime listener, First-Time Caller, John from San Diego.

Mark Hunter
Excuse me. I'm sorry. I just had to throw that. I have a client that has been my client for four years. They beat me up on price, take a lot of my time and frankly, I don't enjoy working with them. Can I fire a client and if so, how? And everybody raise their hands right now and say, yes, you can relate to John.

Meridith Elliott Powell
Oh, my gosh. I mean, you know, it's really funny. I don't I think that as salespeople, we love the hunt so much that we stay in it with people that we would rather, quite frankly, go to the dentist and get a tooth pulled out then then then take care of them.

Meridith Elliott Powell
And I don't care how big the business is, I don't care if it's your largest contract ever. They are costing you more money than they're ever making any more money. So the simple answer to this question is absolutely not only can you, but you should fire this client.

Mark Hunter
Boy, I tell you what, there's a real business philosophical question that you have to ask yourself here. You know that really more than 50 percent of every business's customers, clients don't make money for them. They lose. They lose money on them. You really only wind up making money on it. Very few customers. So here's the whole deal. John, you've got this. Here's the thing. This is a little bit like a bad employee, you know, when a manager holds on to a bad employee.

Mark Hunter
What is everybody else looking around saying, why is this person still here and then when that person finally gets cut loose, everybody goes, thank you.

Mark Hunter
It's about time. Let me tell you something. If this person and John, I don't know your business, but, John, if this person is taking time from you, they're they're undoubtedly taking a lot of time from other people in your company. Here's what I come back to. The most valuable asset you have is your own time. And as Meredith said, we all love hunting. I mean, excuse me. That's that's my name. But I know I'm sorry.

Mark Hunter
A little too much coffee this morning. Here's the whole thing. It there comes a time when you do cut the customer loose and the easiest way to cut the customer loose just raise the price, raise their price. Because here's the whole thing. If they're paying you enough money, you'll put up with the pain. But if they don't want to pay them, they just walk away. They just leave.

Meridith Elliott Powell
We've got Jack Hubbard joining us this morning. And I got to say, he sounds like he is a member of O.J. Simpson's legal team. If it's not a fit, you can't continue to commit. I love that. I love it. So Jack is Jack is so right. Here's my favorite technique for getting rid of a customer that I don't want is I refer them to my competitor. And what I do is I say, let's assume that Mark is being a pain for me and he's not somebody that that I want to continue to do business with.

Meridith Elliott Powell
I'm going to say, Mark, I think that you have got some needs and some concerns that I think that are just a little bit outside of my scope. I think you would be a much better fit for our friend Sam Richter. I'm going to connect you to Sam and I'm going to make that referral. I used to do it all the time when I was in corporate because I figured if I could slow my competitors down with people that are happy, it opened the door for me to go and get and get better customers.

Meridith Elliott Powell
So refer them and go ahead and make that connection to somebody who would be a better fit for them.

Mark Hunter
You know, Meredith, I've been meaning to talk to you about and I can refer you to somebody else.

Mark Hunter
But here's the whole thing. This is what's funny. You got to do a very simple PNL. Is this is this customer strategically or tactically making you money today? And strategically, what's their value for you long term? You got to make come to that decision quickly and make the decision. I see too many salespeople and we've all been in this situation where we hold on to a customer thinking, thinking something is going to turn and what we wind up doing is we do cash flow rationalization, cash flow rationalization.

Mark Hunter
Well, I know this customer is a pain. I'm not making money off of it, but it's creating cash flow. And unfortunately, you can't run a business if you're solely focused on just cash flow. From that perspective, cash flow is good, but it better be positive in this in this means it's sucking a lot of time and effort that could be better spent elsewhere.

Meridith Elliott Powell
Yeah, I also think that, you know, one of the best ways to get rid of a client you don't want anymore is just to be honest, is to say, you know, this relationship, is it really successful for you? It's not successful for me. I really think you're going to be better suited and better taking care of somewhere else. I mean, they sometimes you'll have clients try to backtrack. I mean, they know that they've been kind of a pain.

Meridith Elliott Powell
But once you make that decision, you need to go ahead and move on. Here's the thing about sales.

Meridith Elliott Powell
And I think sometimes the sales professionals, we miss this. The pie is huge. I mean, it's massive. So every time you're giving energy to a customer, you're saying no to potential prospects. Prospects that may buy more from you may be easier to to work with, may be more enjoyable. And for those of you who run your own business, I always think with my own business I should enjoy this. This should be fun for me. So I want to work with people that I enjoy working with.

Meridith Elliott Powell
I just had a client call me back yesterday that that day I didn't I had worked within three years and I was so excited to hear her voice on the other end of my my voice message. And I think that's who I should be working with. So don't be afraid just to be just be honest and say this isn't working out. I don't think it's beneficial to you. I don't think it's helping me achieve my goals. I want to connect you to somebody that I really think will be good for you.

Mark Hunter
And just because you turn them off, just because you cut them off, you're no longer doing business with them doesn't mean the relationship ends. I mean, I've had customers that I've hired and I'm still connected with them. It's just what gets worked out better somewhere else. Here, here's the thing that all really ask you. You have to stay focused on who your ideal customer profile is, your persona. Who is that person? Perfect customer and all venture to say that, John.

Mark Hunter
This client that you're working with does not fit your ICP, because let me tell you something, if this client does fit your ICP, you need to to John just saying, hey, in the interest of time, we should move on to the topic.

Mark Hunter
The topic is handling objections like what John's dealing with, but handling objections in terms of best strategies for getting past. No.

Meridith Elliott Powell
Yeah, you know you know, the thing about getting past no, first of all, I think his sales professionals, we need to shift our mindset about objections to me. The moment that I start getting objections, it really tells me that my customers are interested, they're engaged. They're going to push me. They're going to challenge me. And that is telling me if I can get past those objections, I've probably got a customer for life. So the first thing is start to think differently about objections, expect them and be prepared for that.

Mark Hunter
That's the whole thing. Objections create a conversation and this is what you want. And when the customer says, I had this situation happen to me the other day, had a potential client, and they said no and it generated a great conversation. Now it's been about two weeks. Have we closed the deal yet? No. But you know, it we figured out an alternate strategy that I think is going to turn into something. And ultimately, it's going to be a better solution for both me and the client.

Mark Hunter
So don't hesitate to push back when a customer says no and say why, what what what is it you have to get underneath their thinking in terms of understanding what's the No.

Meridith Elliott Powell
Yeah, I think you also I think with that is you really need to listen. I think so often we're prepared to get past objections if you object on price. I say this, if you object on timeline, I say this. If you object on the fact that now is not the right time, you and you need to just stop and really listen.

Meridith Elliott Powell
Because I think the thing is, no one is a let them say everything, because I just cannot express enough in sales how much your customers need to be heard. They really need to be heard.

Meridith Elliott Powell
So they have an objection. Let them get it out. The other is keep asking open ended questions. So, as Mark said, you can really get to the underlying objection. For example, I just had somebody call me yesterday. I have done a proposal for some sales training for them. They they called me back and they said, we really want to work with you, but we're a small company. The price is too high. Now, you would assume that the objection is price.

Meridith Elliott Powell
I said, let's jump on the phone. Let's have a conversation. And when I got up under it, the objection is they're not really sure their team is going to implement the strategy so they can get a return on investment. I can solve that problem, but if I hadn't asked questions and gotten to the root, I'd be dickering with them on price when price wasn't really the issue.

Mark Hunter
See, that's a huge issue. This whole price. When people say, oh, you're price and it's never price, it's the correlation between price and the value. What's the outcome they're going to get? And you and I have both had this many, many times with clients where they challenge us on price. And I always say when somebody challenges me on price, I come back to what is the outcome that they're looking for. And when you begin to put the price against the outcome that they're looking for in the outcome that I know I can deliver, suddenly that fades away.

Mark Hunter
You see, here's old thing. When people say no, when people throw an objection up and let's deal with no in particular, that's only a moment in time. No is never permanent. It is only a moment in time. And it demands you to clarify. It demands you to have a conversation because no to you is going to be totally different than no to me. I mean, it's if you've got kids, you know what this means, because it's amazing.

Mark Hunter
Kids know if mom says no, it means one thing. If Dad says no, it means another thing. You gotta be looking and understanding what is behind that. No.

Meridith Elliott Powell
Yeah, we've got some great, great listener comments in here. Patrick says try to listen to them. Try not to think ahead of them. Patrick, I think that is so important. It's really about being present, about being focused on what they say. Don't go two steps at and no says really listen and have a conversation. Get in there and really, really try to understand. The other is that acknowledge that objection. Even if you think it's ridiculous, if you don't think that it's right, if you think it's you, if you don't agree with it, doesn't matter.

Meridith Elliott Powell
Acknowledge it.

Meridith Elliott Powell
Let them know that you you respect their objection and you're open to that objection.

Mark Hunter
And that means you're listening to them. And this is this is the four key piece. Within sales, it really comes down to just listening to the customer and understanding, and it comes down to a simple thing that you and I have talked a lot about in terms of what do you do when a customer says something, you ask them another question on it. They share with you something else. US, them, another question. When somebody says no help.

Mark Hunter
Help me understand what what is it that you don't mean? Because here's the whole thing. And this is a battle I'm fighting. You know, we've all heard this term, ABC always be closing. I'm sorry. I'm fed up with that. I'm done with it. It's ABC - always bring value. And the whole thing is when somebody has an objection or they say, no, it's because they're not seeing enough value for what they're looking for, I got to step back and say, how much value am I bring to you and what is the value that you're looking for?

Mark Hunter
I don't know what that value is until I have a conversation with you and begin to understand where you're coming from. Then I can then I can begin to determine what is the picture I need to paint for you.

Meridith Elliott Powell
Yeah, I love what Matt has said here. If you can qualify it, you can overcome it. I do think one thing that we are not looking at here, though, is that sometimes you get into an objection situation and you really have to ask yourself, are you in front of your ideal client?

Meridith Elliott Powell
Because there are some clients that are just incredibly price sensitive. And that's the most important thing to them. The Walmart shopper. Right, Mark. And so you really have to ask yourself before you get into the work that it takes to overcome the objection, you need to ask yourself, am I trying with the right client? Have I really gone back to that? The other thing I'm going to say is that it's often if you are dealing with a lot of objections, you didn't sell the right thing.

Meridith Elliott Powell
You didn't ask the right questions at the beginning. If there's so many objections at the end of the of the sale, then you really have to ask yourself, have I got do I really understand their pain points? Do I really understand the value they're looking for? And have I answered those questions for them?

Mark Hunter
So I got to give that whole phrase around Walmart. My my phrase I use is you can't take a Wal-Mart shopper and make them a Nordstrom customer because it's the same if you're starting off with the wrong person.

Mark Hunter
You know what? It it doesn't matter what you sell. It's the wrong person. And this is the difference in the sales process between a product and a service. If what you're selling is a one off product, there are objections that you're going to overcome and you're going to close the sale. It's fine. But here's the thing. If you're selling a service and there's an ongoing relationship, which I would hope every sale has an ongoing relationship, the selling process is going to help you understand how was this customer going to work with me long term?

Mark Hunter
This this is why it comes back to a Wal-Mart shopper. Nothing against Wal-Mart, but I can't make them a Nordstrom customer. It's just it's just not going to happen.

Mark Hunter
So are these things I'm uncovering in the selling process that says, you know what, this isn't a fit. And it goes back to what Meredith was saying. You really have to know what is your ideal customer profile? Stay in that lane.

Meridith Elliott Powell
Yeah. Yeah. Every time I get a customer who gives me objections, just like I got with that client yesterday and saying, you know, we're a small organization, the price is too high, I acknowledge and give credit to that objection. I say, you know, that's a good question. Let's talk about that, that so that they know I'm not offended by the objection that I actually want the objection. Why do I want the objection? Because if I can handle the objections on the front end before we ever close the deal, then I have got a customer that's going to be so much easier to work with.

Meridith Elliott Powell
So I opened the door to objections. Tell me what you're concerned about. Tell me what you're worried about. How are we going to make sure that this feels like a really good connection or situation for you? Because if you want those things, if you get those things on the front end, they're going to first of all, you're going to have a much better relationship. But if I'm able to if I'm able to handle those, I'm more deeply understand my customer and I'll have a better relationship going forward.

Mark Hunter
Yeah. Don't ever allow an objection or anything like that to have you feeling like it's done. It's over. I can't go any further. No. All those comments, those are early stage factors, early stage. In fact, think about this for a moment. If you have a sale that you're making and the customer doesn't say anything, the customer doesn't respond at all. What's that tell you? What what's that say? Do they really understand what it is that you're saying?

Mark Hunter
Is your price even anywhere close? Because, you know, here's the whole thing. When I have people push back on my price, I go, thank you. That's good, because if nobody's pushing back on my price, I'm taking a price increase.

Mark Hunter
My price is high enough because to a certain degree, here's the whole situation that you have to look at.

Mark Hunter
There are times when you have to evaluate is this is this objection that there is this objection that they are throwing out. Is it worth while? For you to overcome, because here's the challenge, here's where I see a lot of sales people making a big mistake. If they have a skinny pipeline, they don't have many deals in our pipeline. Customer throws out an objection. What happens is the salesperson goes and starts making claims and delivering expectations that can't be delivered on after the sale.

Mark Hunter
You got to be very careful in this. It comes back to this whole thing of staying in your ICP, staying in your lane. Do not allow objections to force you or to cause you to sit there and create a level of expectations that ultimately long term you can't deliver on, because what does that do? That creates an unhappy customer and it creates an unprofitable customer?

Meridith Elliott Powell
Yeah. One last thing I'm going to say is the fact that, you know, you need to use it also as a learning mode, because the objections I get with one customer teach me how to sell better with the next customer. If I pay attention to what Mark's objecting to, then when I turn around and I try to sell to to Patrick or to Matt or to Bill, then I know what to include in that sales call, because most likely, if I'm staying in my ideal client Bill, in that Patrick or Ollie are all going to have the same objection.

Meridith Elliott Powell
So I become a better salesperson. So part of it is overcoming it in that particular sales call. But even if you don't, it was not wasted time because it's made you a better salesperson for the next customer you're going to be calling on.

Mark Hunter
Hey, great conversation there, but we should probably wrap that up. And you got this week's book and I love this book.

Mark Hunter
So introduce it.

Meridith Elliott Powell
Actually Mark, if its OK with you, given what we're talking about. I'm going to change the book at the last moment.

Mark Hunter
Oh! Well! I will say I love it. We are we are getting a last. Moment change. I love you and I have a feeling I know what the book is written by a person with the initials A.W..

Meridith Elliott Powell
Yeah, I mean, I was just sitting here listening to what we were talking about and I thought, oh, my gosh, how can we not mention this book? Right. So Mark and I are lucky enough to be friends with a just a tremendous couple real powerhouse when it comes to overcoming objections. And that's Richard Fenton and Andrea Waltz. And the book is Go for No. And my copy happens to be in my home in my book room right now.

Meridith Elliott Powell
I've got a closet with all my books in it. But if we were going to be talking about this, I just can't mention another book. The book is Go for No Richard Fenton, Andrea Waltz. And just like we said, change your mind about objections, be excited about objections. My favorite story about them, if you ever question that going for no works is Robert must have asked Andrea for dates and to marry him. I don't know how many times, but the guy just kept coming back and coming back.

Meridith Elliott Powell
And now they have been together probably more than 20 years. But but going for no. If you need work on objections, that's the book to read.

Mark Hunter
I have to crackup. I think you and I are tracking the same way with the literally right, because I'm going through the podcast and I see the notes and I go I kind of I got a book I want to recommend.

Mark Hunter
I want to recommend. So that's good. And it's good to anyway. Anyway, hey, great audience feedback. We'll ask you the note and up it. It is. But hey, we've got to get to the lightning round. The lightning round. Put your hands on the buzzer. Get ready for the fastest two and a half minutes of social. No, I don't care what you call how I really butchered that one lightning rod.

Mark Hunter
How to know it is time to fire a client. Go ahead.

Meridith Elliott Powell
Oh, you know what I want to ask there, too, is that it's it is. Let's ask the audience to weigh in, too. If you have great ideas on how to fire a client, we're going to put them. We're going to put that. We're going to put them up here on the screen. But my number one is it is time to fire a client when I am not enjoying the relationship anymore.

Meridith Elliott Powell
When the phone rings or I get an email and the energy drains out of me instead of pours into me

Mark Hunter
a philosophy I always have as many times the most profitable business you'll ever get is the is the business. You don't get fire the client. You'll be more profitable spending your time elsewhere.

Meridith Elliott Powell
Yeah. If the client, the client continues to hammer you on on price or tries to pick it, every little thing that you're doing or you're presenting, it's time to fire the client.

Mark Hunter
If the client does not line up with you from a values and a level of integrity, you need to fire them.

Meridith Elliott Powell
Yeah, I think the fact that if it is a customer who continues to complain and maybe they're telling other people only picking out the negative things that you're doing and they start to spread the word, it is time to fire the client.

Mark Hunter
If the client cannot live with the expectations that you deliver and is always placing demands on you to go further above and beyond and it's not delivering value to you, cut them loose.

Meridith Elliott Powell
Yeah, if the customer is not doing what they're supposed to do, like, I never want my name on a customer who doesn't implement my training coaching client who doesn't do what I ask them to do. So if they're not on track to become successful, for me, it's time to fire our client because my name and reputation is on them.

Mark Hunter
If the client is doing anything that is not of the best interest of all of your employees in terms of respect, in terms of how to talk with them, in terms of what they say about them, fire them.

Meridith Elliott Powell
Yeah, if I got a client who's delegating everything, a lot of times I work with C Suite professionals and if they're delegating it to the next level down, assuming that the next level down needs to do it, but they don't need to do it for me, it's time to fire the client.

Mark Hunter
And I'll tell you what, it comes down to one very simple thing: Strategically are you learning anything from this client? Every client you have, you really need to be learning something that is going to help you grow with another client. If this client is only taking from you taking energy out of you, time to fire them.

Meridith Elliott Powell
Yeah, I think Bill Snow's got a great one here, doesn't acknowledge your results and is constantly complaining. Oh, that is that's huge. It's time to fire. And Matt threw a great one it up here. This is so important. If they don't fit your values, if they show signs or evidence of betraying your values, then fire them. Get out of there. That is so true. I'm blown away by how important values have become, especially really in in this last this last year.

Meridith Elliott Powell
I want to say that if I'm just not enjoying it anymore, like this isn't fun for me, I don't. And I think about firing your client when I don't want to do the work, when I'm not excited about it. It's not fair to the client that I continue to keep them because they're not getting the best of me.

Mark Hunter
You bring up a great point. And we'll close it all up, I'll share you share that, I'll close it out of authenticity and transparency more important than ever. And if this client, this customer does not represent you and potentially put your equity at stake with other customers, you need to fire them.

Meridith Elliott Powell
Yeah, I tend to fire clients that don't show up or move meetings and things that the at the last minute, those that don't value my time and and my resources. I'll certainly let you move one or two last minute. But if it becomes a regular thing, it just tells me you are not committed or showing up late to meetings. That consistently tells me you're not committed and it's time to fire a client.

Mark Hunter
And we're committed to your time.

Mark Hunter
So, hey, with that, let me say thank you for listening to sales logic this week. If you like what you hear, subscribe rate and review the show on your favorite podcast app. If something we've said has earned you a single dollar, consider telling a friend about our show. It's how we grow to help you grow.

Mark Hunter
I'm Mark Hunter.

Meridith Elliott Powell
And I'm Meredith Elliott Powell.

Mark Hunter
Remember, when you sell with confidence and integrity,

Meridith Elliott Powell
uncertainty suddenly becomes your competitive advantage

Mark Hunter
and the sale becomes logical.

Meridith Elliott Powell
All right. We'll see you next week right here, nine o'clock Saturday morning. And we'll have another fabulous conversation about sales.

Meridith Elliott Powell
Bye!